birds

Birds
Birds

Domestic pigeon

Peafowl - The goiter of the birds is a sacking of the esophagus on the neck. The mucosa of the goiter contains glands. Both parents of the pigeons produce a secretion, the goiter's milk, a few days before the young hatch.

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Birds

Domestic pigeon

As early as 1 300 BC BC, pigeons were sent out in Egypt to spread the news of the coronation of Pharaoh Ramses II. Their ability to find their way home safely was known. Other references of the pigeon for transport tasks or today's pigeon flying are a flight performance of 800 - 1000 km day and night in any weather, at a speed of 90 km / h. The fastest cover 185 km / h.

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Mammal

Domestic yak

Domestic yaks are hardy, undemanding animals that easily deal with the cold in Tibet. Due to their broad claws, they are sure-fooded even in snow and are thus used for riding and as beasts of burden. Their meat, usually cut in stripes and dried, is used as food. Tibetans drink yak milk and make it into butter and cheese. Skin is processed into leather, wool into cloth and rope. Dried yak dung is used for fires in areas with little wood. The yak‘s tail serves as a fly swatter.

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other

Dornwald day gecko

Obviously, he enters into fixed pairs. If a partner dies, the surviving animal usually no longer mates. If older animals are caught and an attempt is made to socialize them with other partners, biting is common and can result in the death of one animal. (HENKEL, F. W. & SCHMIDT, W., 2003)

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Birds

Dresden chicken

This fastly growing, wheather-resistent breed was bred in the years 1948-53 from delicate performance animals (Wyandotte chicken, Rhode Island Reds and New Hamphshires) at the suburban area of Dresden. They count as dual- purpose-breed, which exploit their food especially well. The laying rate amounts to about 180 eggs per year, their meat is pale and not fibrous. They are calm and most trusting towards humans.

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Birds

Dwarf silk hen

Silk chickens lack the typical feather structure of birds with the “feather flag” closed, so that all feathers are fluffy like down feathers. Therefore they cannot fly. The calm, trusting hens breed very reliably. They even stay seated when all of their eggs are taken away. Since they also manage their chicks well, they are often taken as "foster mothers" for less reliable chicken breeds.

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Birds

Eagle owls

Eagle owls have large eyes and their pupils dilate almost to the size of the eye opening in the dark. As a result, 2.7 times the amount of light can fall on the retina compared to humans and the eagle owl can see well even in poor light. Owls not only hunt with the eyes, but also with the ears, especially in the dark. For this listening direction, they compare the time difference between the sound coming from the left and right ear and pinpoint the prey.

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Birds

Edwards‘s pheasant

Little is known about the Edwards‘s pheasant, who seems to be extinct in its orign Vietnam. About 1000 birds are in captivity. Using the captive population, zoos try to prevent the extinction of this species. The Edwards‘s pheasant lives in forests. Due to defoliation during the Vietnam war and later deforestation for timber and agriculature, its natural habitat is nearly completely destroyed.

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Mammal

European harvest mouse

Thanks to their specialized paws and grasping tail, dwarf mice can skillfully climb stalks or branches. For rearing boys, they build ball nests between the stalks, which have a diameter of 60 to 130 millimeters and are usually at a height of 1 to 1.3 meters.

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Mammal

European otter

On the zoo - otter’s menue there are mainly fish, small rodents and poultry. The food of wild otter consist of fish, birds, small mammals, amphibians, insects, crayfish, molluscs. Mallards and herons are a “holiday roast”. Occasionally the otter are lucky to catch some wild birds. In this case they will refuse whatever the keepers offers…

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Birds

European wigeon

Wigeons are very reputable ducks. It is the call of the male that has led to the German name of the species. The male introduces his short, sharp, two to three-syllable whistling wiu calls with a krr krkrkrr. The wiu calls can also be heard during the night and are a striking indication of the presence of the species. Flying wigeons can be recognized by their high, whistling-sounding flight noise, which is generated by the wings.

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Birds

Eyebrow Jay

Chinesen halten Augenbrauenhäherlinge wegen ihres schönen flötenden Gesanges zu tausenden als Käfigvögel. Kurz nach dem Schlüpfen nehmen Händler die Küken aus ihren Nestern und bringen sie auf Märkte in große Käfige, die in viele kleine Fächer unterteilt sind. Dort werden sie durch Handfütterung gezähmt. Nach 3-4 Wochen wechseln sie den Besitzer und kommen in reich verzierte Käfige.

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Birds

Ferruginous duck

The peat duck is the smallest European diving duck. It differs from a swimming pool, such as the mallard due to its compact body. The feet sit further back on the body. Her tail dips into the water while swimming and she needs a run-up to start flying out of the water. In the Lausitz, the peat duck is a regular, albeit rare, breeding bird. She lives quite inconspicuously throughout the year.

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Mammal

German black pied cattle

The (German) black pied cattle was originally bred in the lowland of Northern Germany, the Netherland, and Denmark. It was utilized for both meat and milk. With around 5000 kg of milk per year, the milk production is less than in specialized dairy breeds. However, the black pied cattle is more muscular and therefore also used for meat.

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Mammal

German domestic goat

In the past, many families kept an animal to make sure that they have enough food. Since a cow was so expensive, the goat became „little man‘s cow“.

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Mammal

German saddleback

The German saddleback has many good qualities: its meat is of high quality, the animals are robust and the sows are good mothers, raising their piglets successfully even outdoors. Since their meat is not as lean as people prefer nowadays, this breed has become increasingly rare and is considered endangered.

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Birds

Golden pheasant

The golden pheasant leads a solitary life. Only during mating season, the male pursues the female with piercing calls and a spectacular dance. With a raised crest and neck feathers, covering beak and neck, the male jumps around the female in a circle. Then he suddenly turns around and hops a circle in the opposite direction. All the while, the pheasant utters a metallic-sounding „chap-chok“ call. After mating season, the male leaves the female who has to care for the young on its own.

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Mammal

Golden-headed lion tamarin

Golden-headed lion tamarins are very social animals, living in groups of two to eleven individuals. Only one female has offspring, the reproductive cycle of the others is suppressed by pheromones. Therefore, the young are exclusive and are cared for by the whole group: older siblings and in particular the father carry the young, usually twins, on their back.

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Mammal

Gray kangaroo

Although the largest mammal in Australia, the giant kangaroo cub is no larger than a gummy bear at birth. It measures just 2.5 cm and weighs less than 1 gram! Although completely underdeveloped, it finds its way from the birth opening into the mother's pouch and clings to a teat with the mouth that it won't let go of for the next two to three months. Immediately after the birth of a young animal, the female mates again. However, this embryo only develops and is born when the older cub has finally left the pouch.

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Mammal

Green vervet monkey

Green vervet monkeys live together in large groups of up to 80 animals consisting of a few males and many females with offspring. High ranking individuals receive privileges while foraging, they are often groomed by low ranking group members. Especially eye-catching is the carmine coloured penis and the azure scrotum of the males. These sexual organs are displayed in order to impress other males.

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Birds

Grey heron

Vom reichen Nahrungsangebot angelockt, brüten Jahr für Jahr immer mehr Graureiher im Tierpark. Im Jahr 2004 waren es schon 34 Paare - mit den Jungen insgesamt also etwa 200 Vögel. Sie sind sehr gewitzt, ja manchmal unverfroren und machen den Störchen, Kranichen oder Fischottern das Futter streitig. Die Tierpark-Tiere müssten Hunger leiden, wenn ihnen die Pfleger nicht zusätzliche Rationen oder das Futter in speziellen Behältern anbieten würden.

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Birds

Griffon vulture

Griffon vultures spend many hours a day looking for carrion. By soaring through the sky, they only use little energy. After finding carrion, the vulture rips into the belly, pushes his head into the carrion and feeds on the inner organs. Head and neck are only sparsely covered by feathers and thus easy to clean. At the end, only skin and bones of the carrion remain. As a result, vultures prevent spreading of diseases.

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